Plastered

This morning as I listened to the radio I heard a song I hadn’t heard for a long time. It got me thinking about one of my philosophies in life. The song was this one by Ralph Mctell  . The streets of London tells you to stop feeling sorry for yourself because you really don’t have much to complain about compared to the people living on the streets of London.

My life has never been easy, it has been a struggle right through my adult life for one reason or another. I might at times write about the things that have or are happening in my life but I usually manage to laugh it off rather than complain. The reason being that no matter how bad things might get, I know, there is always someone worse off. 

When I lived with my first husband who was an emotionally abusive alcoholic, life was difficult and at times unbearable I was grateful that he never hit me or my boys.

When I had stage three cancer, I was grateful that I was treatable, 13 years on I am still here to tell the tale.

When I was a single mother struggling to make ends meet, I did at least have a roof over our heads and our health even if there was very little money for heat or food. We still had each other.

During the difficult times in the first year of my second marriage, my husband’s ill health (both physical and mental)  were made easier by the support of family and friends.

I do know people who always see the negative in everything, I feel sad for these people who never seem to be able to allow themselves to be happy. People who live their lives as victims of life make me feel mad. Yes there was a time when I felt like one of those victims where nothing in life ever seemed to go right. Then I realised that there was only one person who could change my life, me.

Coincidently this morning the girlfriend of my son Pug, posted this quote on her facebook page. ‘We can’t change every little thing that happens to us in life, but we can change the way that we experience it’

Now, when things don’t go right I count my blessings instead of my problems. When I am feeling my lowest I think of the things that make me smile.  I remember my wonderful sons, I surround myself with flowers, music and laughter. I watch the birds as they go about their day.

From where I am sat writing this I can see sunshine through the windows, there are four vases of flowers in the room and when I look through the kitchen to the back door I see one of the pigeons, that frequent my bird feeder, strolling  around as though he owns the place.

A few days ago my husband had a fall when he was crossing the road, a kind man, who happened to be walking near by helped him up and got him home. He had blood on his hands, arms and more worryingly on the back of his head. I left work to take him to the hospital. He was assessed and taken to ‘major injuries’. We were left in the corridor with a growing number of others for about 1.5 hours (it could have been worse). Finally he was checked by a Dr, x-rayed, put on a drip and sent to the observation ward where his broken hand was plastered.  After much deliberation and conversation the Dr concluded that my husband needs treatment for his alcohol intake. This is something my husband is in full agreement with.

He may be in pain and having to learn to cope with being one handed whilst his hand is in plaster. The cut on his head was merely a graze which appeared worse than it was due to the amount of blood. However his fall has led to something being done about helping him to stop drinking. If he manages to complete the treatment on offer and stops drinking he should be able to get his strength back properly and maybe he will be fit enough to actually work. He will then be able to earn some money as well as save money by not buying drink.

Now here is a little something to lift your spirits The Corrs

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7 comments on “Plastered

  1. I love your attitude. You are absolutely right. We must chose how to live our lives; as victims or victors. I used to be like that, a horribly depressed person, seeing only the dark and negative, never able to view the future with anything besides dread. I fought hard though, and finally with the help of antidepressants, and some good therapy, and 25 years, I have reached the other side. I have a lot of sympathy for those too depressed to count their blessings. I am especially kind to those people.

  2. Dear Lady, what a lot you have been through. I appreciate your positive outlook. I like that you see blessings in the face of challenges. I get up every day believing that anything is possible – that every day will be a good day. It doesn’t always work out like that, but I know my life is better with a positive attitude.

    I’m sorry to read of your husband’s fall, but yes, this may be something to help him in the long run. I’ll keep you both in my thoughts and prayers.

    I’ve never heard Streets of London. What a lovely song.

    • Maddie I have always loved the song but probably didn’t appreciate what the words were saying until much later.

      I do believe that if you expect to have a bad day then that is what you will have. Therefore if I expect to have a good day then it can’t be as bad as it could have been if I had let it.

  3. Mig says:

    Ah! that song. What a good songwriter McTell was.
    I’m so happy to hear that your husband has been offered treatment. Even more that he wants it, it’s a huge first step.
    And I love your attitude : )

  4. Mig says:

    Hope things are ok. Thinking of you.

  5. Hi Mig thank you for your concern, and for making me realise how long it has been since I visited my blog let alone wrote anything here.
    I have just been so immersed in my life that I have neglected to write on here. This I shall now endeavour to rectify.

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